14. Is the recent progress of humanoid robots a threat?

 

My thoughts are as follows:

Crimes are motivated by desires. Desires are linked to biological properties of human beings. As long as humanoid robots do not include the biological properties linked to desires, humanoid robots will not be able to self-plan and self-execute any crime. However, humanoid robots could be the tools for bad guys to use in a process of committing crimes. But, such scenario could be avoided with built-in software which evaluates and monitors the consequence of humanoid robots’ actions.

Ming Xie

13. Google CEO Sergey Brin, “I didn’t see Artificial Intelligence coming. How wrong was I?”

My short response to his question is as follows:

If we believe that Artificial Intelligence simply means computer-aided human intelligence or computerized human intelligence, then we have already achieved a great deal in this direction. And, all the data-based decision-making systems are good examples of such achievements.

If we believe that Artificial Intelligence should mean machine’s, or robot’s, self-intelligence, then only very few people are making the progress into this direction. And, we are still in the infant stage in this direction. Most importantly, I believe that much more resources should be put into this direction, instead of continuing to speculate about computer-aided human intelligence or computerized human intelligence.

Ming Xie

 

12. What is dynamic biped walking of humanoid robots?

In the video below, Professor Oh did not believe that there should be a specific term on dynamic walking.

Please share your view about the classification of biped walking by humanoid robots.

 

Below is my short viewpoints:

According to the supply of mechanical energy, biped walking can be classified into two categories: one is called actuated biped walking and the other is called non-actuated biped walking. However, our main concern here is about the stability or balance, which is a challenge to both planning and control of biped walking by humanoid robots.

Interestingly, in the domain of biped walking, there are two types of stability or balance. One is called static stability or balance, in which the zero-moment point (ZMP) is always within the support zone of a humanoid robot’s foot or feet (assume that there is no other contact point between a humanoid robot and the environment). The other is called dynamic stability or balance, in which the body supported by biped maintains its state of motion. For example, in the sagittal plane of a humanoid robot, a dynamic stability is achieved with a successive clock-wise rotations of legs for backward walking or a successive of counter-clock-wise rotations of legs for forward walking. And, in the coronal plane of a humanoid robot, a dynamic stability is achieved with periodic oscillations of clock-wise and counter-clock-wise rotations of legs.

Hence, on the basis of these two types of stability or balance, we can classify biped walking into the following two categories: static walking which maintains static stability, and dynamic walking which maintains dynamic stability.

Ming Xie